Tips to avoid pre-diabetes/ prediabetes: treatment and prevention

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in a recent study, have found many Americans are not aware of pre-diabetes condition. The study also found rates of pre-diabetes increased with age, ranging from 2.7 percent among those ages 18 to 44 to 6 percent among those over age 65. Rates also increased with weight — 2.3 percent among those with normal weight, 3.9 percent among those who were overweight, and 6.3 percent among those who were obese.

It can be added that pre-diabetes is the condition where the blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. It can also lead to diseases like type 2 diabetes (NIDDM) other than heart disease and stroke. The CDC researchers also found the rates of pre-diabetes increased with age. It grows to 6 percent among 44 year old from 2.7 percent among those ages 18. The other factor is weight. Rates also increased with weight — 2.3 percent among those with normal weight, 3.9 percent among those who were overweight, and 6.3 percent among those who were obese.

Other than pre-diabetes itself , the disease has five conditions indicative-impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, borderline diabetes, and high blood sugar. For worse, the study finds pre diabetes is more common in women than men.

Of the 984 people in the study who’d been told they had pre-diabetes, 64.4 percent were told they had borderline diabetes, 38.3 percent were told they had high blood sugar, 33.7 percent were told they had pre-diabetes itself, 15.5 percent were told they had impaired glucose tolerance, and 15. 2 percent were told they had impaired fasting glucose. In addition, 43.3 percent were told they had two or more of the five conditions.Of the 984 people who’d been told they had pre-diabetes, 68 percent tried to lose or control weight, 55 percent increased their levels of physical activity, and 60 percent reduced their intake of dietary fat or calories. Only 42 percent engaged in all three risk reduction activities, and 24 percent didn’t participate in any of these activities, the study found.

Hopefully , the disease can be prevented. And as prevention is better than cure, the same is applied to the disease too. Researchers suggest proper change in lifestyle can be fruitful. It includes a proper diet and a good exercise routine can do the wonder.

To conclude, researchers of the study said,

“An important opportunity exists to reduce the preventable burden of diabetes and its complications by increasing awareness of pre-diabetes among those who have the condition, and encouraging the adoption of healthier lifestyles and risk reduction activities among all U.S. adults.”

Source: msn health & fitness

Filed under Diabetes | Tags: , , , , | Comment Below

Related?

Leave a Reply


Protected by Comment Guard Pro