Insulin therapy ineffective in genetically type 1 diabetes patients

Finland researchers have found that the Insulin therapy is not effective in the infants with genetically type 1 diabetes. Researchers from the University of Turku find that in children with elevated genetic risk, nasal insulin started soon after detection of diabetes-associated autoantibodies had no effect on development of type 1 diabetes.

Animal and pilot studies had suggested that insulin could reduce diabetes incidence, possibly by allowing the beta cells to rest and minimizing autoantigen production, the researchers said. The results of the current findings agree with those for a similar strategy with oral or subcutaneous insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Trial 1, noted David B. Dunger, M.D., Ph.D., and John A. Todd, Ph.D., both of the University of Cambridge, England, in an accompanying commentary.

During the intervention phase, 42 children who had received insulin and 38 on placebo developed type 1 diabetes.Insulin therapy appeared to make no difference in the age at diagnosis or time from appearance of autoantibodies to diagnosis. The rate of progression to diabetes was 16.8% (95% confidence interval 11.7 to 21.9) per year in the insulin group and 15.3% (95% CI 10.5 to 20.2) per year in the placebo group. Overall, insulin had no effect on the cumulative incidence of diabetes (hazard ratio 0.98, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.43, P=0.91).

The rate of progression to diabetes was 16.8% (95% confidence interval 11.7 to 21.9) per year in the insulin group and 15.3% (95% CI 10.5 to 20.2) per year in the placebo group. Overall, insulin had no effect on the cumulative incidence of diabetes (hazard ratio 0.98, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.43, P=0.91).

The researchers cautioned that screening for susceptibility to diabetes presents ethical concerns because no prevention or cure for the disease is available.

Source: Medical News

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